Category Archives: Yellow Tea

A Tea Culture Grows in New York City

I am not a New Yorker. I’m a transplant. A Northern Californian relocated from his foggy climes to the urban jungle of New York City. I ride the subway. I see the rats (all of whom I rather enjoy the company of). Amidst the daily clamor, the concrete jumble, the yelling, the kicking, the screaming, I find peace. Eked-out by my motto of “take time to make time”, I have found my solace.

For those who know me, this takes many forms: cooking, exploring, music, meditation, tea. First and foremost, tea. Tea has saved me somehow. From the madness of a PhD candidacy to a vow of poverty, up through to my current life in New York City’s regular and daily “churn”, to simply sit with tea is “just enough”.

But to say I’ve done it alone is to ignore the countless people, places, and spaces that have supported my (and many other’s) cultivation. I’m taking about tea houses and their owners. The people who make it happen.

From the mercantile to the monkish, the tea merchant crisscrosses a vast expanse of ideological and psychological forms, creating along the way spaces dedicated to “their version” of “the Way”. No one is incorrect in their iteration, but each produces something purely their own.

Love them or leave them, what they do is (and will always be) difficult. Turning a tiny leaf into a mighty buck. Boiled water. Ceramic. Bamboo. Paper. Glass. Iron. Caffeine. The list goes on. Yet, I, too have been in their shoes, though only for a while.

To their tough travails I offer up this article, published today on Sprudge (itself, a coffee-centric publication). Even in this realm, tea (the second most consumed beverage worldwide) is a side note (though a noteworthy one).

My little guide to New York City’s tea houses is by no means complete. By no means extensive. Just a breath on the wind. But I hope it causes conversation. I hope it sparks pondering. This city is always evolving, and, currently, it holds some of the nation’s (dare I say the world’s) most interesting tea houses.

Leave a comment

Filed under Ceramics, China, Education, Green Tea, Hongcha, Japan, Korea, Matcha, Meditation, Oolong, Pu-erh, Sencha, Tea, Travel, White Tea, Yellow Tea

EXCLUSIVE: History in a Bowl of Tea: Tea in the Ming & Qing Period

Scott_Tea_Meditation_July18

Beloved readers of Scotttea,

I’m excited to share the full video of Wednesday, July, 18th’s tea talk and interactive workshop “History in a Bowl of Tea: Tea in the Ming and Qing Period” (1368-1912). Held at Floating Mountain Tea House in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, this event is part three of an ongoing series covering the history of tea, from its development as a folk medicine over 6000 years ago into the beverage we love today.

In this event, we discussed how the loose leaf teas have their origins in the monumental shifts that marked the period of the Ming in Qing, from experimentation in oxidation and pan-frying to inventive brewing techniques and international trade. We explored the impact scholars, poets, emperors, and artisans had on tea art and the development of gong fu cha (literally the “skill and challenge of brewing tea”). And we examined antique teawares from the Ming and Qing period and learn about the evolution of tea brewing, from teabowl to gaiwan to Yixing teapot.

This event included tea tastings of China’s famous teas accompanied by step-by-step demonstrations of Ming and Qing period tea preparation. Below, as a supplement to the almost three-hour long video, I’ve provided a listing of the contents of the presentation (featured in the first half of the lecture), as well as a list of the teas brewed (and how they were prepared).

“History in a Bowl of Tea: Tea in the Ming & Qing Period”

Link to video

Ming and Qing Presentation Thumbnail.png

Above is just a fraction of what is included in the 30+ slide presentation. Topics discussed were as follows:

  • China Before the Ming Period Tea in the Song & Yuan Period
  • China in the Ming Period
    • Tea in the Ming
    • Famous Kilns
    • Tea Technology: Gaiwan, Kettles, Braziers, Teapots
    • Tea and Globalization in the Ming
  • China in the Qing Period
    • Tea in the Qing
    • Tea Production Art & Craft of the Qing
    • Gong Fu Cha Tea Culture in the Qing and in the World

Teas tasted:

1st Tea: 2014 南糯山生普洱 Nán nuò shān shēng pǔ’ěr, Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China (brewed in contemporary reproduction of Ming period Yixing gaiwan)

2nd Tea: 水仙 Shuǐxiān “Water Immortal” Wuyi Mountain yancha oolong, Wuyishan, Fujian, China (brewed in a early 2000s fang-gu-shape Yixing teapot)

3rd Tea: 八仙 Bāxiān “Eight Immortals” Phoenix Mountain dan cong oolong, Chaozhou, Guangdong, China (brewed in a 1990s shui ping hu-shape Yixing teapot)

4th Tea: 正山小種 Zhèng shān xiǎo zhǒng, Lapsang Souchong, Wuyishan, Fujian, China (brewed in a contemporary Jun-yao-glazed teapot)

5th Tea: Charcoal-roasted 鐵觀音 Tiě guānyīn “Iron Goddess of Mercy” Anxi-style oolong, Nantou, Taiwan (brewed in 19th century-early 20th century Si Ting Hu-shape Yixing teapot)

6th Tea: 野生大葉白茶 Yěshēng dàyè báichá Wild “Big Leaf” White Tea, Fuding, Fujian, China (brewed in contemporary Qing-shape Jingdezhen white porcelain gaiwan)

****

Look out for more tea talks and workshops soon to be added to this blog. I regularly present and moderate at museums, universities, tea houses, cultural centers, etc. For speaking inquiries, feel free to reach out to scotttea888 (at) gmail.com.

 

Leave a comment

Filed under Ceramics, China, Education, Green Tea, History, Hongcha, Japan, Korea, Matcha, Oolong, Pu-erh, Sencha, Tea, Tea Tasting, Vietnam, White Tea, Yellow Tea

EXCLUSIVE: All About Green, Yellow & White Tea

IMG_7754

Dearly Beloved Readers of Scotttea,

I am excited to share with you the tasting notes and LIVE video feed from my most recent tea talk and interactive workshop “All About Green, Yellow & White Tea”. Held in the intimate confines of Floating Mountain Tea House in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, this tea gathering offered participants a “three hour tour” (literally three hours) of green, yellow and white teas from all over China, Korea and Japan. Beyond being a highly-caffeinated evening, the tea talk and workshop was also highly-immersive, as I offered up my tips and quips on tea history, production, and brewing styles.

Needless to say, I am forever grateful to both Floating Mountain Tea House and to the folks who attended and made this memorable evening happen. For all those who could not attend, I offer to you now, in all its glory, the full video and tea tasting lineup from “All About Green, Yellow & White Tea”!

“All About Green, Yellow & White Tea” (Link to video)

Teas Tasted:

1st Tea: Spring 2018 蒙頂甘露 Méngdǐng Gānlù, Meng Ding Shan, Sichuan
2nd Tea: Spring 2918 西湖龍井茶 Xīhú Lóngjǐng Chá, Hangzhou, Zhejiang
3rd Tea: Spring 2018 六安瓜片 Lù’ān Guāpiàn, Liu An, Anhui
4th Tea: Spring 2018 太平猴魁 Tài Píng Hóu Kuí, Hou Gang Village, Anhui
5th Tea: Spring 2018 야세작 Wild Sejak, Hwagae, South Korea
6th Tea: Spring 2018 かぶせ煎茶 Kabuse Sencha, Nara, Japan
7th Tea: Spring 2018 蒙頂黃芽 Méng dǐng huáng yá, Meng Ding Shan, Sichuan
8th Tea: 2000s 老單芽黃茶 Lǎo Dān Yá Huáng Chá, Yunnan or Sichuan
9th Tea: 2017-2018 芽寶 Yá bǎo, Nannuoshan, Yunnan
10th Tea: 2014 白牡丹茶餅 Bái mǔdān chá bǐng, Fuding, Fujian

Leave a comment

Filed under Ceramics, China, Education, Green Tea, History, Japan, Korea, Sencha, Tea, Tea Tasting, White Tea, Yellow Tea

A Gift From Time

IMG_7969

Getting ready for tonight’s tea talk and workshop “All About Green, Yellow & White Tea” at Floating Mountain​ Tea House in Manhattan resulted in me finding a sealed canister of an early 2000s 單芽黃茶 (Dān Yá Huáng Chá, literally “Single Bud Yellow Tea”), most likely produced from the tea farms around Pu’er in Yunnan or Meng Ding Shan in Sichuan.

IMG_7970

The tea leaves, which hadn’t see the light of day for over a decade, still had a green and golden hue. They offered a light fragrance of fresh almonds and fall leaves. Upon the first infusion within a white porcelain gaiwan, the tea woke up from its long and gentle slumber, expressing subtle flavors of sweet sugar cane, rose water, and dried apricots.

IMG_7963

Yellow tea (黃茶 huáng chá), unlike green tea, is a bit unusual as it will receive a moderate level of oxidation during what is usually a very labor intensive process. As is the case with many teas, each type of yellow tea has its own very specific processing method. Some yellow teas, like 君山銀針 (Jūn Shān Yín Zhēn, literally “Jun Mountain Silver Needle”) will go through an initial drying (often in shade), a low-heat pan frying (lower than green tea so as not to fully halt enzymatic oxidation), and controlled oxidation, which often involves wrapping the tea leaves in paper to promote oxidation (蒙頂黃芽, Méng Dǐng Huáng Yá , “Meng Ding Yellow Bud” also uses this paper-wrapping method). The tea is then “finished” by a low-heat roasting. Other yellow teas, like 莫干黄芽 (Mò gàn huáng yá, “Mo Gan Yellow Bud”) are processed using full-sun drying and quick, high-heat pan frying, before being hand-kneaded and finished with indirect charcoal roasting.

The general result of these particular processing methods is a tea that is not as bright and grassy as a green tea (think flavors found in teas like 碧螺春 Bì Luó Chūn, 黄山毛峰 Huáng Shān Máo Fēng, or 龍井茶 Lóng Jǐng Chá), but is more floral and sometimes even raisin-like, akin to some oolong teas. However, given the diversity of leaf types used, the innate flavor given by the differences in climate and soil composition (“terroir”), and processing, each yellow tea ends up having its own distinctive flavor. While categorically smaller and less-known as other tea types, this makes yellow tea an interesting and exciting tea to explore.

IMG_7973

Although far more quiet than its fresh counterparts, this “re-discovered” aged yellow tea spoke volumes. Part history, part romance, drinking this tea both taught me about past production methods and reminded me of how tea was (and still is) a labor of love. How such attention to detail by an unknown “tea master” (the person who makes the tea), resulted in a tea that still has the ability to enchant a tea drinker after almost twenty years since it had been crafted is simply astonishing.

As I’ve said before, tea is a gift. As such, aged tea, such as this one, is a gift from time.

****

Stay tuned tea blog readers, as I will be posting notes and video content from tonight’s tea talk and interactive workshop “All About Green, Yellow & White Tea” on the next blog post!

Stay thirsty, stay curious!

1 Comment

Filed under Ceramics, China, Education, Green Tea, History, Oolong, Tea, Tea Tasting, Yellow Tea